A New Google-Uber Delivery Service

09 of September 2015 | By John Granville | Posted in News and Tips

You may have already heard what Amazon is up to when it comes to the future of fast delivery service. It’s still in the development stages, but the buzz about it is that it's already in the air. The name of the service is Prime Air. Amazon will be sending autotomized drones to deliver packages. These drones will revolutionise the way in which we send our packages - forget road obstruction or traffic jams causing shipping delays. From the time you order you may well be opening the content of your package within a mere 30 minutes. While this service sounds terrific it is far from ready. Many technical obstacles, like not having a drone land on someone’s head still need to be resolved and certain systems must be in place before this service will become available to the public.

Amazon is already a giant, in fact it’s the world’s largest retailer. Amazon sells everything but competition is good for the market, and with Amazon dominating the industry who out there can give Amazon a run for their money? The answer is Google/Uber.

Google owns a large share of Uber, the car passenger service that can be ordered at the click of a button in many metropolitan areas. Uber already effectively gets people to their homes, imagine if a driver picked up groceries or a package along the way. By bundling additional services Uber could become an affordable delivery machine.

Like Amazon Prime Air, Uber’s courier service faces big challenges. Delivery services are very organized, and require amazing system management. Amazon has some of the world’s most advanced storage facilities, 96 Fulfillment Centre warehouses worldwide that handle 300 customer orders per second. Uber is not set up to pick up from warehouses and most facilities have systems that wouldn’t be able to sync with Uber’s app-based service.

Amazon is very aware of its competitors and has put together a proposal to compete with Uber. A crowd-sourced delivery service based on an app similar to Uber would allow people to deliver packages to retailers who will store them.

 Today's innovations will change the way we experience our deliveries tomorrow.     

John Granville

By John Granville

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